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Q:  Why is my LiveWello gene variance report different than from other gene apps?

ag5zfnJlc291cmNlLXFuYXITCxIGQW5zd2VyGICAgIC294IKDA Livewello FAQs Question: Why is my LiveWello gene variance report different than from other gene apps? Answer: The most likely reason for these differences is the choice of minor allele used by the app to determine phenotype. The criteria seems to be constantly changing, probably because this a relatively new and rapidly evolving field of science. To quote openbioinformatics.org: "One obvious problem with this coding scheme is that one must know the "forward strand" with certainty, but this is usually not the case. Even for the well studied human genome, there are still many holes to be filled. It is possible that a sequence is assembled into the forward strand in 2004 human genome assembly, but it becomes reverse strand in the 2006 human genome assembly. It is also possible that a sequence cannot be assigned into either forward or reverse strand, so it's annotated as something like chr1_random in many genome databases. It is also possible that a stretch of forward strand becomes reverse strand in a particular subject due to inversion in this region." Livewello's gene variance reporting algorithm simplifies these complexities by using consistent and reproducible methods which show a person’s actual phenotype based on the presence or absence of a minor allele. Hence for a minor allele of 'A' on the forward strand, a person with genotype TT, will be -/-, while a person with a genotype of AG will be -/+. All our minor allele information is fetched directly from NCBI's dbSNP and is reported on the forward strand. This is the same DNA strand used by 23andMe, 1000Genomes and many other reporting authorities. Even though genes never change, as the genetics community learns more about SNPs, the interpretation of genetic raw data, certainly will. This is why your Livewello App comes with free updates. http://resqua.com/100005927200207/why-is-my-livewello-gene-variance-report-different-than-from-other-gene-apps

The most likely reason for these differences is the choice of minor allele used by the app to determine phenotype.

The criteria seems to be constantly changing, probably because this a relatively new and rapidly evolving field of science. To quote openbioinformatics.org:

"One obvious problem with this coding scheme is that one must know the "forward strand" with certainty, but this is usually not the case. Even for the well studied human genome, there are still many holes to be filled. It is possible that a sequence is assembled into the forward strand in 2004 human genome assembly, but it becomes reverse strand in the 2006 human genome assembly. It is also possible that a sequence cannot be assigned into either forward or reverse strand, so it's annotated as something like chr1_random in many genome databases. It is also possible that a stretch of forward strand becomes reverse strand in a particular subject due to inversion in this region."

Livewello's gene variance reporting algorithm simplifies these complexities by using consistent and reproducible methods which show a person’s actual phenotype based on the presence or absence of a minor allele. Hence for a minor allele of 'A' on the forward strand, a person with genotype TT, will be -/-, while a person with a genotype of AG will be -/+.

All our minor allele information is fetched directly from NCBI's dbSNP and is reported on the forward strand. This is the same DNA strand used by 23andMe, 1000Genomes and many other reporting authorities.

Even though genes never change, as the genetics community learns more about SNPs, the interpretation of genetic raw data, certainly will. This is why your Livewello App comes with free updates.

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