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Q:  What info is available about the MAO A Gene ?

ag5zfnJlc291cmNlLXFuYXITCxIGQW5zd2VyGICAgIC4jNYIDA MAO A Gene Question: What info is available about the MAO A Gene ? Answer: MAO A Monamine Oxidase. This “Mops up Serotonin” This enzyme defect allows you to spare serotonin, another “feel good hormone”. A partial defect can be useful in maintaining this important neuro-talker in the community, particularly when bacteria are present. Bacteria often gobble up tryptophan, the major precursor to serotonin so that anyone with bacterial issues (history of recurrent infections, gut issues, etc), tend to have low serotonin levels. Nevertheless, a full defect can lead to more serotonin sparing, though you are probably still somewhat low despite this full block. Since this enzyme acts much like the COMT, only in filtering out serotonin, full blocks may lead to mood swings, volatility, and poor sleep. Why? Well, when an area becomes saturated with too much hormone, a feedback system is in place to slow down its’ production. Just as most refrigerators have a built in system for regulating ice production, your body has an inherent alarm system for controlling excessive hormone levels. As serotonin levels rise, an alarm bell goes off, relaying the risk of system overload. Consequently, serotonin production drops and you have more potential for more extreme highs and lows. Low Serotonin levels may lead to anxiety, OCD & perseverative behavior (thinking about something over & over again or worrying), depression, poor sleep, and even eating disorders (anorexia & bulimia), etc. Labs: Urine 5HIAA levels I do not recommend treating a partial defect. Anyone with a full defect should follow up with his or her healthcare provider. General Support: 1. Serotonin boosting may be required with medications (SSRI’s such as Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil) or Seromood at HHI 2. MAO A RNA, in most cases, not necessary. 3. Address chronic bacterial issues: Oftentimes, gut bacteria gobble up tryptophan, the major precursor for serotonin. To Learn More-- Dr. Amy Yasko PhD: http://www.dramyyasko.com/resources/webisodes/ Dr. Richard Deth PhD: http://wn.com/oxidative_stress,_impaired_methylation,_and_transsulfuration_in_neuronal_cells_richard_deth,_phd Dr. Jill James PhD http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/events/toxicology_recorded_events.html (2006 lectures, please scroll down for oxidative Stress Lecture as well). http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/videos/video_tox.html (2010 Lecture Methylation/Oxidative stress). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlpXANOeWac&feature=related http://resqua.com/702188759/what-info-is-available-about-the-mao-a-gene

MAO A Monamine Oxidase. This “Mops up Serotonin”
This enzyme defect allows you to spare serotonin, another “feel good hormone”. A partial defect can be useful in maintaining this important neuro-talker in the community, particularly when bacteria are present. Bacteria often gobble up tryptophan, the major precursor to serotonin so that anyone with bacterial issues (history of recurrent infections, gut issues, etc), tend to have low serotonin levels. Nevertheless, a full defect can lead to more serotonin sparing, though you are probably still somewhat low despite this full block.

Since this enzyme acts much like the COMT, only in filtering out serotonin, full blocks may lead to mood swings, volatility, and poor sleep. Why? Well, when an area becomes saturated with too much hormone, a feedback system is in place to slow down its’ production. Just as most refrigerators have a built in system for regulating ice production, your body has an inherent alarm system for controlling excessive hormone levels. As serotonin levels rise, an alarm bell goes off, relaying the risk of system overload. Consequently, serotonin production drops and you have more potential for more extreme highs and lows. Low Serotonin levels may lead to anxiety, OCD & perseverative behavior (thinking about something over & over again or worrying), depression, poor sleep, and even eating disorders (anorexia & bulimia), etc.

Labs: Urine 5HIAA levels
I do not recommend treating a partial defect. Anyone with a full defect should follow up with his or her healthcare provider.
General Support:
1. Serotonin boosting may be required with medications (SSRI’s such as Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil) or Seromood at HHI
2. MAO A RNA, in most cases, not necessary.
3. Address chronic bacterial issues: Oftentimes, gut bacteria gobble up tryptophan, the major precursor for serotonin.

To Learn More--
Dr. Amy Yasko PhD: http://www.dramyyasko.com/r...

Dr. Richard Deth PhD: http://wn.com/oxidative_str...

Dr. Jill James PhD
http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.ed... (2006 lectures, please scroll down for oxidative Stress Lecture as well).
http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.ed... (2010 Lecture Methylation/Oxidative stress). http://www.youtube.com/watc...

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